見出し画像

Mikey Storied, the Rush Gaming "Sensei"

(日本語版は末尾に)

My name is Ulara Nishitani, CEO of a Japanese esports team called Rush Gaming. I do mostly make my living by doing marketing and producing work for brands, but as a main "life" work, I’m running this little esports team, struggling but happily building to grow it bigger.

As a CEO, sometimes it’s real hard to simply thank or praise one staff considering how that affects the organization’s work ethic, but this one is something I just genuinely wanted to write about for a long time.
(Well I do also believe/hope this should help people to understand who I’m like :)

Today I’m writing about a guy, who I met in June 2018.
His name is Mikey, known as “Storied” and also "Story Sensei" in Japan.
This post might sound super fuzzy, and also, to all the English-speaking people, this is written by a Japanese woman who studied in the UK for 2 yrs so some parts also might sound weird. (When you find parts that sound weird, please let me know because I’d love to learn how to write better 🙂

First Experience in the US

We met him online while Rush Gaming, the esports team who competes in Call of Duty in Japan who at that time was the dominant champion in the Japanese CoD scene, was boot-camping in Anaheim. Being the dominant, undefeated champion team in Japan without experiencing what the level is like in the US, we totally underestimated what we could do there.
Soon after we started scrimming (Scrim=practice matches) we realized how ignorant and just weak we were. It was simply shocking and it was just getting worse every day because we were just too weak that not even pros, just “top amateurs” started declining the scrim offers we sent.
In Japan, it was totally the opposite. We used to struggle to find scrim partners who were as good as us in Japan, but in the US, we just were not a good enough deal to take.

By the way, I wanna mention one team here, eUnited. I honestly have the highest respect for eUnited's management team and the players who used to play for the org, specially Clayster.
They accepted our request to do a scrim when we were just a new team coming from Japan, who simply were not even good enough for their practice.

How we met

Back to the Anaheim Bootcamp story.
Even though we could not scrim with the pros like we wished before we came to the US, we were having scrims from 2 pm in the afternoon with 2-3 intense sessions every day, which just was amazing compared to the fact we can only find 1 or max 2 scrims from 9 pm in Japan.
However, it was so hard to figure out what really is different and how we should approach this totally different level of a game by ourselves. The team was in the dark, and I myself is not a CoD player, meaning, just a super useless English speaking CEO who well, yeah maybe does great PR work but… an esports team without an esports solution or useful advice? Then .. yes I felt pretty useless. 

So I started sending messages to people who took our scrims, asking
 “What do you think about Rush Gaming? Can we have some quick advice?”
Imagine getting this in your Twitter DM.
Yeah, normally people do ignore that. 
Honestly speaking I do also ignore a ton of DMs daily too.

So all the Rush players were like
“Come on, nobody will reply to that. Why would they do that? It’s just such a waste of time…”
That’s maybe true. Yes, it does not mean anything to people to voluntarily answer this and give us advice.
So my expectation was low.
Just not completely giving up.

This is when Mikey came in.

He was one of the players who constantly took our scrims on twitter.
We were staying in a close area (west coast side) and maybe the connection wasn’t as bad to scrim, and just maybe better than not doing anything for them. We were outplayed and losing badly every time we scrimmed.

He replied with probably 3 tweets long paragraph about how he thought what our issues were.
(I wish I could show you the screenshot of the actual message,but it’s gone. Twitter does not seem to save all the DM data..)

I was so excited and the boys might have found me super annoying but hey, everyone was super amazed to face how Mikey was breaking down all the important points in the game and how detailed they were.
He even asked us to send our game play video to see exactly how we were playing and how the minimap looked like on our screen and sent us a feedback document.

画像1


This is the actual feedback document.

Can you possibly imagine how hopeful I felt that time? I put aside all the work I needed to do and translated this to the Rush Gaming boys, hoping they can learn from it. I probably cried then for having some hopes.

Few days later I saw on Twitter that Mikey and his team had an issue with their org refusing to pay for their upcoming tournament trip fee. It didn’t take me even a second to give a hand.
Honestly speaking I’m normally a careful person. I have never just given people cash especially people who I have not met face to face. But with Mikey, I just was happy to grab some $500 cash in my hand and met him the first time in the venue at CWL Anaheim.

I honestly believe it was the biggest innovation to Japanese CoD scene.
Having even just 1 team, or even player who has experienced how we should approach things, it will eventually spread by others digesting it.

Not only the fact Mikey has been supportive to the team, the fact his advice and coaching was so valuable and meaningful to the team, it led to more and more things later on, such as

GreedZz started thinking and writing like Mikey does
One of the key players started being like Mikey. More focus on the team win and devotes his time on writing what needs to be done as a team

Rush players learning how to run a fast try and error cycle with having a hypothesis first
Before people just play and do things on the fly. Now more with plans first and adjustments with the result.

Huge English learning motivation as people want to learn from Mikey
GreedZz tried so much to translate Mikey’s document, which basically takes 10 times more time than I do, but the hard work is definitely is paying off.
Now Vebra and Gorou are taking a lesson every week to slowly studying a language. (You know how hard it is to start learning when you are so soaked up in gaming)

Japanese esports players realizing the “level” required to be professional
Not only Rush players but also many esports players in Japan are looking up to Mikey for the way he thinks and acts in and outside of the game, which really makes people realize what “professional” is.

We learn from each other.

When I struggle with management, especially when I’m under high pressure and a lot of work and things to worry about, which normally comes from people, one of the things I often do is to look at and remember Mikey’s work.

One of the things is of course about what he does. It is a great inspiration to me, about the timing and how detailed and honest his feedbacks are, which is something not many people can do as a lot of people can do some fuzzy, vague feedbacks to “kind of” make people understand but not anymore. However, giving precise feedback and also in written form is another level of work. 

画像2


Another thing I also look up to is actually more about HOW he gives feedback.

One day he asked me,
“hey which feedback did the boys listen more? The soft one or the blunt one.” 
I then gave him the insights from being with the team, who is good at what and how they normally react to things. His feedback style changed one by one, day by day, like really sensitively tweaking the UI of a service. This was even before he was officially a coach for Rush Gaming.

Sometimes, I feel sad that I forget doing the same. Everyone is different, yes I don’t forget this part as it’s damn obvious, but hey. Always keeping that in mind, and yet not giving up to get them improve to win, is just simply, respectful. It’s easy that you think you cannot help, and let the players figure out by themselves.

We all know but it’s extremely hard to execute the things we know.
Some people read many books, watch so many youtube videos about many things like how to coach or how to manage people and have a handful of knowledge, and still cannot do how we wanna do it. 
So what you do, is really, who you are.

Gaming can be a hope.

Through this eSports activity, I truly believe that esports or gaming can be a hope when taken seriously. It ignites people’s heart, pushes them to work hard and can make people supportive and inspire in many different ways. With games, some people can show more, do more, and try more.
Life is hard sometimes, but hopefully, gaming can show more about the good side of human beings and this story, I hope was one of them.

Mikey, the Rush Gaming coach who is only 21 now has taught me more than any other adults or books in the last couple of years, and so do the other players in Rush feel. Everyone in the org has the highest respect to him and it is what he gained over his actions.

Actions tell >>>>>∞ tweets :)

Thank you for reading!

Mikey lives in somewhere close to Palo Alto, learning mechanic engineering.
If anyone is interested to know more about him, I am the one to talk to.

日本語簡略版記事
(直訳じゃなくて意訳です)
ーーー


今日は、ある青年の話しをしたいと思う。
出会いは2018年6月。
彼の名は、マイキー・通称Storied、
そして日本では"ストーリー先生”の愛称で慕われている。

初アメリカ進出の時

彼とは、Rush Gamingの米国遠征合宿の際に、オンラインで知り合った。
当時のRush Gamingは、正に無敵無敗の日本チャンピオン。まさに満を持してアメリカの地へ降り立った。
だがしかし、一度も本場アメリカのレベルを経験したことが無かった我々は、遠征先で練習試合をはじめるやいなや、その圧倒的レベル差に衝撃を受けた。
アマチュア相手にも全く歯が立たない。
そして事の深刻さを見せつけるかの如く、元々期待していたプロチームとの練習はおろか、アマチュアチームからですら試合のオファーを度々断られるようになった。それは、日本では普段全く正反対に状況だった自分たちにとって、非常に屈辱的だった事は言うまでもない。
そうして日を追う毎に、そのレベル差は実感を伴って重く重くのしかかっていった。

出会い

普段日本では夜9時から、とれても1チームか最大でも2チームくらいとの練習試合しか出来ない。
それを考えれば、アメリカでは昼間から2-3チームと練習が組めるだけでも恵まれた練習環境ではあった。
しかし、あまりの実力差にチームはどう自分たちでこの状況を噛み砕いていいか、アプローチしたらいいのか、突然の事に完全に浮足立ってしまっていた。どうすればいいのか、明確な道筋がたてられない。日に日に不満は募っていき、チーム内での不和、仲違いや喧嘩もあった。そんな中、CoD選手でもなく、まして大してゲームすらしない、英語だけ話せるだけの私は非常に無力だった。

そこで私は、ある日手当たり次第に試合を組んでくれたアメリカ人プレイヤー達にDMを送った。
「Rushのこと(プレイ)はどう思いますか?なにか簡単でもいいからアドバイスをもらえませんか?」
急にこんなDMを貰ったら・・もちろん普通の人は無視だと思う。
私自身も相当数のDMを毎日無視する。

当然Rushメンバーも、「そんなの返してくれるわけじゃないじゃないですか。相手にとってみたら、時間の無駄ですよ・・」といった反応だった。
確かにその通りかもしれない。
彼らにとっては、文字通り、無償でやる意味が全く無い・・。
私の期待値は低かった。
ただ、完全に諦めてはいなかった。

マイキーは、この時唯一返信をくれたプレイヤーだった。

彼は、数少ない、コンスタントに私達の交流戦を受け入れてくれたチームの一人だった。滞在先が西海岸だったため、LA周辺在住が多かった彼らからすれば、回線的にも悪くなく、まぁ、相手がいないよりはマシだったのではないかと思う。それほどに、毎回の試合の結果は凄惨たるもので、練習相手になっていたのかと不安になるほどだった。

そんな中彼は私のメッセージに対し、なんと長さにして3ツイート分も課題分析したメッセージを返してくれたのだ。(実物を見せたいがもうDMデータに残っていない・・TwitterDMは永遠ではないみたいだ・・

正直選手からうざがられるかというほどに興奮した瞬間だった。あまりにも詳細で、明確に重要なポイントが分解されていたのだ。それだけでも十分にありがたかったのだが、なんと彼は更に、「詳細にフィードバックしたいから、視点が分かる動画を送って欲しい」という。相手目線からではなく、私達のプレイヤー視点でどうプレイしてるのか、ミニマップにはどういう情報がうつっているのかが見えればより詳細なフィードバックができるという。

そしてそのすぐ送られて来たのがこのドキュメントである。

画像1

この時の感動は筆舌に尽くし難かった。全ての仕事を後回しにして、1秒でもはやくRushのみんなが読めるように翻訳した。多分少し感動して泣いたように思う。

そしてその数日後、彼の所属するチームが彼らの支援を急に止めてしまい、来る大会への渡航費などが間に合わないということをTwitterで知った。協力しようと、それを見た時にすぐに思った。正直、顔も合わせた事もない人にいきなりお金を渡そうなんて思ったことは人生で一度もなかったが、彼は本当に特別だった。500ドルを握りしめて、アナハイムで初めて彼と顔をあわせた。とてもうれしく、心から幸せな瞬間だった。

彼との出会いは、日本のCoD競技シーンにとってある種の革命だったと思う。1チームだけでも、いやもしかしたらただ1人でも、アメリカ式の考え方ややり方を覚える事によるシーンに与える影響は大きい。

また彼の献身的な姿勢のみだけでなく、彼の素晴らしい仕事の質も、様々なチームへの良い影響を及ぼしている。

グリードはマイキーのような思考と、書く技術を真似るようになった。そして個人よりもよりチームとしての視点で、チームに必要な事を考え「書く」という事に集中するようになった。
前よりも試合や練習前に仮説を持って挑むようになったし、速いトライアンドエラーサイクルを回すようになった。
英語への学習欲も上がった。マイキーが書くものを理解したいからだ。そしてグリードはドキュメントの翻訳をよくするようになった。翻訳スピードは私の10倍はかかるが、努力の量に比例して良い効果がたくさんあった。選手のべブラと五郎も今では週1で英語のレッスンをうけている。週1であっても、言語を学ぶというのは難しい。真面目に学習するという行為は尊いものだ。
そして、ゲーム内外でのマイキーの考え方ややり方を通して、日本では「プロ」というレベルが段々と認知されてきているように感じる。

共に学び合う

私がことマネジメントに悩んだ時、特にプレッシャーやオーバーワーク、人に関する心配が積み上がった時、私はよくマイキーのことや仕事を思い出し自分を鑑みることがある。

一つはもちろん、彼の行動や行い、そのものにある。仕事の内容や出すタイミング、その具体性や誠実性は、多くの人ができそうでできないことだ。人への指摘というのは、抽象的になりがちで、なんとなく理解してもらった気になっておわってしまいがちだ。時間もかかるし、気を使うことではあるが、それを的確に書き伝える彼の仕事ぶりには、毎回感銘を受ける。


Playing Aggressive vs. Playing PassivePlaying Aggressive vs. Playing Passive 積極的にプレイする事 VS 消極的(受身的)docs.google.com

Rise vs Red Reserve Forest HPVod link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D3MJDNMKDCQ&t=3docs.google.com

またもうひとつは、彼が「どう」指摘を書くか、そのスタンスやマインドセットにある。

ある日彼はこんなことを聞いてきた。

「ねえみんな、どういう感じの指摘はよく聞いてる?結構ぐさっと書くようなやつか、ちょっと柔らかい方か、どう?」

それをうけて私は、当時のメンバーの性格や、どう物事に反応する傾向にあるかなど個別にインサイトを共有した。見事に彼は、それに応じてフィードバックを調整するようになった。まるでそれは、繊細なUIの調整のようだった。そして驚くべきことに、これはまだ、Rushのコーチになる前のことである。(そんな話をする前でもある)

時々、こうやって書いてるとまるで当たり前のように感じることが自分ができていないときがあって凹むことがある。みんな一人ひとり全く違う。当然わかっているつもりである。だがしかし、だ。常にそれを頭におき、そして諦めず、辛抱強く勝利へ導こうとする姿勢は、ただシンプルに尊敬に値する。アドバイスしてみたものの状況が変わらないからといって、じゃあ自分たちでやらせよう、と放おってしまうことは簡単だ。(それも時には大事だが)

今は本当に知識や知見が豊富に本やYouTubeにある。知ってることは多いけど、それを実行するのは本当に難しい。行動こそが本質で、行動こそがその人の全てだと思う。

ゲーミングは希望になると思う。

eスポーツ(やゲーミング)は、真剣に、人間の希望になると思っている。人々の心に火を灯し、人々を動かし、貢献的にさせて、様々な意味で良い影響を与えてくれる。ゲームを通じて、今までは出せなかった自分の良さを出せたり、より行動できたり、挑戦できたりすることもある。人生とは時に難しいこともあるが、願わくば、ゲームが人のより良い部分を証明するとともに、この話がそんな1つの事例になれば嬉しい。

ちなみにマイキーは、現在21歳、アメリカはパロアルト近くに住み、機械工学を学ぶ理系学生で、Rushや、他アメリカチームのコーチをしている。
彼は、正直どんな文献やベテランの大人達よりも、私達にたくさんのことを、その行動をもって教えてくれる、大切な仲間である。


この記事が気に入ったら、サポートをしてみませんか?気軽にクリエイターを支援できます。

note.user.nickname || note.user.urlname

eスポーツに関する本を執筆しました! 1億3000万人のためのeスポーツ入門 https://amzn.to/2VLbNYY マーケット概要から、チーム運営、法律に関してなどがまとまっています。

ありがとうございます!結構これが楽しみで書いてたりします!
41
Rush Gaming Inc./ Wekids Inc.代表取締役CEOeスポーツに関する本を執筆しました。「1億3000万人のためのeスポーツ入門」https://amzn.to/2VLbNYYマーケット概要から、チーム運営、法律に関してなどがまとまっています。
コメントを投稿するには、 ログイン または 会員登録 をする必要があります。